A man who loved life

Vincent van Gogh, a man who loved life.
For many years, I’ve admired Vincent van Gogh’s paintings, because behind his rough brushes strokes, there are so many little stories that want to go out to let people imagine what was life at that precise moment when the painting was being done.
This admiration for his work, took me to read two wonderful books about the artist’s life. The first one, of course, it had to be the Letters by Vincent Van Gogh. By reading this book one can almost feel that is right by Vincent’s side, seeing him writing all those detailed letters to his brother Teo telling him about his hopes and dreams as well as his darkest moments.
The second book, Lust for Life by Irving Stone, it’s to me an amazing piece of literature in which the author takes the reader to walk along Vincent’s life, from the moment he starts painting, to all those times in which doubt came to him filling his life with desperation. It also shows those few moments on his life that made him feel hope for a better future, and those other times in which he felt happy and amazed by the unique colors and forms of nature, and how alived he felt by seeing all this. In the end, Vincent dies alone, insecure and not knowing if all his efforts to paint better were even worth it.
After finishing the book, it’s really hard not to wonder what it’d have been if only Van Gogh could’ve had a glance of the future to see how admired his work is now?
May be he’d have been able to deal better with his maddness and he had kept on painting for many more years… Saddly, we’ll never know.

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Author: The Traveling Book Club by Nora Vasconcelos

I'm a born writer and a journalist who loves books so much that can't live without them.

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