The sinking ot the Titanic. When fiction becomes true

By Nora Vasconcelos

The amazing story of a doomed voyage.
The amazing story of a doomed voyage.
I’ve always being amazed by those authors who have the outstanding capacity to write works of fiction that feel absolutely real, although their plots talk about things that are not real, inserted into the real world.

And it’s even more amazing when this imaginary realities, born and developed in a novel, become true, as it has happened in many times with the stories written by Jules Verne.

This week I’ve been surprised one more time, learning that the American author Morgan Robertson described in his book Futility (also known as The Wreck of the Titan) a story very similar to the actual one that took the Titanc ship down into the ocean in April, 1912.

In his book, published in 1898, Roberson called the boat Titan, and it was a fancy ship able to carry 2,000 people on the sea where it finally sank in April after hitting an iceberg.

As it happened 14 years later, the book by Robertson described the ship as ‘unsinkable’ and ‘indestructible’, but when the momenent of the truth came through, the boat actually went down, with almost all its passangers dying due to insuficient resourses to save them.

Roberson writing is easy to read and make the reader feel like a very close witness who’s able to see, step by step, the doomed voyage that started like a luxury cruise and ended in a terrible tragedy.

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