From Beethoven’s hands

Text by Nora Vasconcelos

Music from the heart.
Very well recognized around the world for his beautiful music, Ludwig Van Beethoven spent as well some of his time writing several letters, from his early years around 1783 when he was a young man talking about his love for music to Frederick Maximilian, to the last year of his life in 1827, when he wrote to Ignez Moscheles, a Czech composer, letting him know his intentions of finishing his 10th symphony as soon as his health improved.

This letters were put together in a compilation made by Ludwig Nohl, a German music scholar. These letters were published in German, in 1866. Years later, the book Beethoven Letters was translated into English by Grace Wallance.

From this collection of letters, three of them were taken to be the base on which the movie Immortal Beloved was done. The movie takes the name of one of the phrases written by the composer while asking her to remain faithful to his feelings.

Now, a new chapter in Beethoven’s life can be known, as this week was presented to the world another letter -recently discovered- written in 1823 by the composer, this time to the musician Franz Stockhausen.

Beethoven trusted this time his trouble to Stockhausen, asking him for help to promote his work as he was having some money and health problems. As contradictory as it might seems, nowadays this document it worth nearly 200,000 dollars.

Licencia Creative Commons

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Author: The Traveling Book Club by Nora Vasconcelos

I'm a born writer and a journalist who loves books so much that can't live without them.

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